Baxter Sponsors 2015 Education Advantage Scholarships

So good health is probably the best thing in the world; when you are overall healthy, even having hemophilia, you can handle life so much better. 
The second best thing? An education! Below is an announcement about a way to help you get your education, from Baxter Healthcare Corporation.
_____________________________________________________________________
For the sixth consecutive year, Baxter Healthcare
Corporation is sponsoring the Education
Advantage
scholarship program to help eligible members of the hemophilia
community offset the costs of higher education, advance their careers, and
pursue their dreams.
The scholarship program is open to people with
hemophilia A or B (factor VIII or IX deficiency), including those with
inhibitors (factor VIII or IX deficiency), regardless of which brand of factor
treatment they use.
The program provides financial aid for a wide
variety of educational options, including four-year bachelor’s degrees,
associate’s degrees, technical/vocational certifications, as well as the GED
Test. Scholarships will be awarded up to:
·       College/University
– $7,000 renewable for up the three additional years
·       Community
College/Technical School: $1,000 – renewable up to one additional year
·       GED: $150
(one time only)

To date, 211 scholarships that include 113 renewals have been awarded, totaling
more than
$1.1 million. The Education Advantage
program is supported financially by Baxter and administered by Scholarship
America, the nation’s leading independent scholarship program
administrator.  Scholarship America
reviews all scholarship applications, determines eligibility, and selects the
scholarship recipients. Baxter has no input into the selection of recipients
Education
Advantage
scholarship program applications are available as at https://www.scholarsapply.org/baxteredge,
or by calling Scholarship America at 877-544-3018, or by emailing baxter@scholarshipamerica.org.

Applicants can apply online, download the application and mail it in, or
request a paper application. 
Completed applications for scholarship renewals are due to Scholarship
America by February 15, 2015, while the deadline for new applications is April
15, 2015.


To get started now, or for more information on the Education Advantage scholarship program,
including eligibility requirements, visit www.scholarshipamerica.org/baxteredge,
call Scholarship America at
877-544-3018, or send an email to baxter@scholarshipamerica.org.
Visit www.nava.baxter.com
to read about previous recipients of Education
Advantage
scholarships and receive tips about preparing for college.
Nava.baxter.com also highlights other resources offered by Baxter to help
patients advance their lives, focusing on career development, health
management, and community involvement.

Baxter is a registered trademark of Baxter International Inc.  USBS/MG1/14-0980   January
2015 

This blog was sponsored by Baxter Healthcare Corporation.

Excellent Book I Just Read

Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the History of Exploration [Kindle]
by David Roberts

Incredible true story of Australian Douglas Mawson, who led the Australian Antarctic Expedition from 1911-1913, during the so-called Heroic Age of Antarctic Expedition. Leading one group of three that set out to measure and scientifically observe new territory in the Antarctic, Mawson lost one comrade to a glacier; the other slowly and painfully died while he and Mawson tried to return to base camp. Left alone, with limited food and no dogs, in a land where the wind routinely blows at 65 mph, and the temperature is 40° below, Mawson, starving, somehow survives 31 days and single-handedly finds his way back to his waiting teammates. It is an amazing, incredible story of survival, full of suffering beyond measure, but I’d say one of the greatest story of survival in the history of exploration. Roberts takes unneccesary swipes at Lennard Bickel’s excellent book, Mawson’s Will, which helped the world outside of Australia first get to know this remarkable man and his unforgettable story. Four/five stars.

Jambo Kilimanjaro!

At 19,340 feet, Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain on the African continent and the largest freestanding mountain in the world. And guess what? I am going there in August! I’m actually going to hike it and attempt the summit. Why? Not just because it’s there, but as a fundraiser for Save One Life.

Save One Life is a child sponsorship program for children with blood disorders in developing countries. I founded this 10 years ago to help the poor I saw during my trips overseas. We now have 750 children and adults with hemophilia enrolled, and we hope to add many more! Remember, of the estimated 400,000 with hemophilia in the world, 75% have little or no access to factor. They need our help. And we have a way to help them.

The climb is the brainchild of Eric Hill, president of BioRx, a homecare company, and a sponsor of two kids with hemophilia. Last year he, an employee, and a person with hemophilia, Jeff Salantai, climbed Mt. Rainier. That was a highly technical climb, meaning they had equipment, ropes and crampons. Thankfully, Kilimanjaro is not a technical climb, but it’s no walk in the park! With a team of ten, we will trek for 4 days, hopefully summit on the 5th, and then come all the way downhill in one long day.

Would you like to help us?

Visit http://www.saveonelife.net/mt-kilimanjaro-climb.php

See who is climbing with me! And consider making a donation. Note that climbers underwrite their own travel expenses: so 100% of your contribution will go toward Save One Life’s core services and Africa programs. Please be sure to email us to let us know who you are sponsoring!

Asante Sana (thank you)!

Jungle Photos (www.junglephotos.com)


Great Book I Just Read

Home of the Blizzard by Douglas Mawson

In December of 1911, Douglas Mawson, an Australian geologist, set out Antarctica to explore a 2000 mile long coastline to gather scientific data and search for the magnetic pole. What happened is one of the greatest survival stories of all times. When one companion falls to his death in a crevice, and takes most of the supplies with him on his sledge, Mawson and his remaining companion struggle on. They only had six dogs and one sled with enough food for ten days. Their struggle to survive is surreal; the dogs are reduced to eating the leather straps on the sledges, or even the hair from the reindeer sleeping bags. One by one, the men eat the dogs to survive. And it’s this that led to the demise of Mertz, who becomes delirious and dies. Vitamin A poisoning from dog liver is suspected, but not in this book, as there was no word even for vitamin then!

Alone, Mawson heroically staggers back in blinding katabolic winds, and temperatures of 40 below. How he survived is beyond belief and makes for a gripping read. Mawson is a professor and geologist, and the book is old, so expect some stilted writing and highly technical explanations. But Mawson is one of exploration’s greats and this is a classic. Four stars.

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