Bayer Hemophilia Leadership Development Program (BHLDP)

Want to be a Leader?

Leonardo di Vinci once wrote: Ask
advice of him who governs himself well. 
Learning to govern oneself is a principle of leadership, and can be taught and then honed. But not just through books. Often, the best leadership tenets are learned in real life. Bayer is offering a chance for young, potential leaders to govern themselves, test themselves and put their burgeoning leadership in action.
The Bayer Hemophilia Leadership Development Program is one of my favorite programs in our community. It’s a rare opportunity to be in the thick of decision-making, action and marketing. Read about it below, and apply at www.HemophiliaInternship.com! Deadline is March 13!

 Start shaping your future and your community! 
Apply today for the Bayer Hemophilia Leadership Development Program. 
APPLICATIONS ARE DUE NO LATER THAN 
Friday, March 13, 2015 at 11:59 p.m. ET 
To learn more and complete an application, visit www.HemophiliaInternship.com
 Making a change in the world begins by making a change in your community! Apply to be an intern through the Bayer Hemophilia Leadership Development Program and begin to learn how to be the change YOU want to see in the world. 
Students enrolled full-time in college who are touched by hemophilia can apply now for the opportunity to: 
Engage in leadership training and hands-on business projects 
Learn how to support the hemophilia community as a potential future leader 
Apply now for a six-week paid internship at Bayer HealthCare’s U.S. headquarters in New Jersey. 
In addition to working directly with leaders at Bayer, selected interns will: 
Collaborate with local hemophilia organizations and learn about efforts to support the hemophilia community and partnerships with business professionals 
Meet with healthcare public policy professionals to experience first-hand how effective advocacy relations impacts legislative decisions 
Be responsible for developing a project that will be presented to Bayer Senior Management.
Learn more at   www.hemophilialead.net

Great Book I Just Read
Take Yourself to the Top
Laura Fortrang
This is the perfect book for beginning leaders. A hard-hitting, direct and fun read about how to clarify your needs, set goals and remove obstacles to your goals. Fortrang is a life coach who shows us that without self-mastery, we will continue to be victims of our own biases, addictions, blaming mindsets, and circular thinking. A quick read, fun and impactful, you will start to make immediate changes after reading this! I’ve been reading this book for over 10 years every January to kick off the new year and get myself on track. It works! Four/five stars. 

Become a Leader! (Fast!)

We have a lot of programs in the hemophilia community, but this is one of the best. You may need a lot more than just a diploma to secure a great job; you’re competing with talented and smart people. One thing that all prospective employers look for (me included) is leadership: that esoteric quality about someone that sets them apart from the pack. You don’t always learn it in school, but you can learn it here.
I was present in 2006 when a group of great people from our community came up with this idea and presented for funding. The Bayer
Hemophilia Leadership Development Program
(BHLDP) provides college students from the hemophilia
community a unique internship opportunity to build foundational leadership
skills while also deepening their connection to the hemophilia community.
BHLDP, now in its eighth year, gives selected interns an opportunity to work
directly with the Bayer marketing team in Whippany, New Jersey. Interns also
get to experience rotations which include a public policy awareness session in
Washington D.C., a community advocacy-focused visit to National Hemophilia
Foundation in New York, and activities with Bayer’s partners. 
When discussing their favorite aspects of the internship process, the former interns commented that they were surprised—and thrilled—by the amount of real work they were able to do during their time with Bayer. “We were exposed to real meetings and real experiences,” said Lewis Chesebrough, a 2012 BHLDP intern. “We participated in a
real professional environment with people who were supportive and kind to us.”

In addition to getting to do real, meaningful work, the program also helped interns chart a course for their future. Christian Mund, a member of the 2013 internship class and a junior at Syracuse University, said that his Bayer internship helped him realize marketing was the path he wanted to pursue following graduation. “Before the internship, my local sales representative asked what I wanted to do after college; I had no idea. After I finished the BHLDP internship program, I knew marketing was what I wanted to do because the internship really opened my eyes to what I could do after graduation and now I am looking for other internships in marketing.”

Following a BHLDP internship, many former interns have stayed involved in the hemophilia community. Rich Pezzillo, a member of the 2007 internship program, is now the Communications Director at the Hemophilia Federation of America (HFA). “The BHLDP internship helped give me direction on what I was most passionate about and how I felt most
fulfilled,” said Pezzillo. “I now have opportunities to help other young adults that may not have the proper resources or the family to talk to about what it is like to have a bleeding disorder.” And Aaron Craig, a member of the 2010 internship class, started a company called Microhealth that developed an app for the hemophilia community that he says is like
“Facebook for the health care system of hemophilia.”

Bayer is currently accepting applications for the 2014 Bayer Hemophilia
Leadership Development Program. Applications for the six-week, paid internship
are due by Friday, February 28, 2014. (Yeah, I put that in red, so move on it!) For more
information and to apply visit https://www.livingbeyondhemophilia.com/webapp/index.jsp

For US patients only.
(Truth in advertising: The above is an unpaid announcement for the common good)
Great Book I Read
Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man: What Men Really Think About Love, Relationships, Intimacy, and Commitment   by Steve Harvey

This was a gift from my co-worker Zoraida, who obviously thinks I need help in the dating department. She might be right, after reading this hysterical and no-nonsense view of how women should date from a man’s point of view. Blunt and taking a somewhat dismal view of men in general (think “dog training”), there are still some nuggets of truth here and it’s a whole lot of fun to read anyway! Men are not just from Mars, they are an entirely different species altogether and in sever need of BF Skinner’s behavioral training. I read it in one night and laughed a lot. And learned a few things. Three/five stars

Wanted: Leaders!

You may have heard that the hemophilia community is a bit worried about developing leaders. Our generation is getting “old,” and has fought our many battles, and continue to fight on the insurance front. We need young people with talent, ambition, compassion and vision to carry the torch in the future.

But are we victims of our own success?

We’ve made life good for the new generation of kids with hemophilia, and as expected, they are having good lives–and disappearing from our radar screen. We need them to come back, to pitch in, to help, to lead.

To address this, Bayer developed a unique program in our community to train young people to think about careers in hemophilia, or at the very least, to give back through volunteering. Bayer HealthCare offers the Bayer Hemophilia Leadership Development Program (BHLDP), and expanded it this year by adding a community element to the internship experience. The 2012 interns selected to participate in this prestigious program will spend five weeks of the eight-week program at a local hemophilia organization.

The company is currently seeking applicants who are attending college and have been touched by hemophilia. Those interested have until Monday, March 12th to apply for the program, which runs from June 18th-August 9th. Participating interns will engage in leadership training, hands on business projects, marketing and communications strategies, and help support the local hemophilia community. Additional details and the application can be found at
www.livingbeyondhemophilia.com/intern.

Of the many organizations that applied to participate, four chapters were chosen to mentor and manage an intern. They are the Arizona Hemophilia Association, Bleeding Disorders Alliance Illinois, Hemophilia Foundation of Upstate New York – Rochester and Texas Central Hemophilia Association.

The 2012 program begins with a two-week orientation at Bayer HealthCare’s U.S. headquarters in Wayne, NJ, where the interns will receive training on communications, problem solving and leadership skills as well as work with people in a number of departments to gain insights into how various parts of the company operate. Interns will spend the following five weeks at the selected hemophilia organization, where they will gain first-hand knowledge about the work done on a local level and engage in projects building on the skills developed earlier in the program. During the final week at Bayer, the interns will report on their experience and present a project developed with their local chapter.

Bayer established the Hemophilia Leadership Development Program in 2007. Since that time, many program participants have become more active hemophilia advocates and have gone on to careers serving the community, government and industry.

This is a fantastic opportunity. If you know of a young person with hemophilia who has leadership potential, please have them apply today!

Great Book I Just Read
The Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science by Douglas Starr (Kindle edition)

Starr never fails to engage. From 1894 until 1897 in the countryside of France, Joseph Vacher, a vagabond and discharged military enlistee, began a bizarre killing spree, from young women to little shepherd boys. Dispatching his victims rapidly, mutilating or violating them, and moving on immediately, he became a killing machine that terrorized France and baffled police. Forensic science was nearly nonexistent, and police imprisoned innocent people based on hearsay. Meanwhile, Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne, France’s leading expert in legal medicine and professor at the University of Lyon, dedicated himself to the case and in the process advanced forensic science. Ultimately, this became one of the first cases of determining what is legal insanity, as Vacher, once apprehended, became his own counsel in effect and pushed to be declared insane. A battle ensues between Vacher and Lacassagne, which would have repercussions for decades to come. Fantastic story, well written, and enlightening. Four/five stars.

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