Blood

The Bloody Book of Blood

Like the pages out of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, we’re seeing books get banned in some states. Math books, even!  Our favorite hemophilia archivist, Richard Atwood of North Carolina writes, “School libraries, and even their school librarians (can you believe it?), are under attack, with more and more books being banned for their content.” Richard provides a review below of juvenile literature that explains blood, including hemophilia, to young readers. He adds, “Kids seem to enjoy being grossed out!” And hopes it does not get banned!

This text on blood in Kelly Regan Barnhill’s  2010 book, The Bloody Book of Blood, is classified as juvenile literature. Hemophilia is included among the numerous blood topics. Hemophilia is explained in the section “Blood Disorders” that is accompanied with a photograph of a bruise on page 22. The text states: “Hemophilia is a rare, but serious blood disorder. This disease keeps a person’s blood from clotting properly. Patients with hemophilia need to be extra careful. A cut can bleed for days, and it may never heal completely. Even a small bruise can be a big problem. The extra blood pools under the skin, causing the bruise to grow to a huge size.”

Hemophilia is defined in the glossary, along with a pronunciation guide. The text states: “hemophilia (hee-muh-FIL-ee-uh) — a health condition in which blood does not clot normally.”

This is an educational book, part of The Amazingly Gross Human Body series that includes texts on blood, vomit, spit, snot, sweat, and… pee. This short book with a large font includes one page for a glossary, one page for an index, one page for “read more” and internet sites, 16 illustrations, and 4 “gross facts.” Michael Bentley, a professor of biology at Minnesota State University, Mankato, acted as a consultant.

“The author simplified the definition of hemophilia appropriately for juvenile readers, yet a simple note on proper treatment, and maybe genetics, would be beneficial,” Richard adds.

Kelly Regan Barnhill.  2010. The Bloody Book of Blood. Mankato. MN: Capstone Press. 32 pages.

Texts That Protect

If something big were happening, you’d want to know about it right away, especially if it concerned the factor you or your loved one uses. The Patient Notification System (PNS) is a free service that will notify you about any withdrawals, recalls or warnings concerning your specific product, and even ancillaries. Are you signed up with it?

Launched in 1998 by the Plasma Protein Therapeutics Association (PPTA), a group that is supported by manufacturers of plasma-based products and recombinant products, this system has diligently sent out hard copy, telephone and email notices of any changes in your prescription drugs.

There was a time in the early 2000s when these were frequent, as there were shortages, plant shut-downs, recalls, products taken off line, and more. You can imagine that the specter of the mass HIV infections in the blood supply in the 1980s led to this unique and vital service.

There’s good news now: stringent manufacturing practices, better donor screening and genetically-engineered products means that notices of safety concerns are almost a thing of the past.

Are you signed up? You should be. It’s free, confidential, and now fast! Just recently, the PNS added notifications by text, probably the fastest route these days.  You will want to be up to date on any changes in the product you use.

Sign up for the PNS at www.patientnotificationsystem.org or call 888-UPDATE-U.

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