Takeda

Coming Changes: Kogenate® FS Discontinued

It was bound to happen sooner or later: in a community flush with hemophilia A therapies, one of them would have to give.

This past week Bayer announced that it would discontinue production of Kogenate® FS (Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant), which has been in use since 1993. I’m nostalgic about it leaving; when it appeared, my second born was only 3. We used it at one point. We educated the community that it was the exact same product as Helixate®FS… though many parents tried to argue with me that they had different names and were from different companies, and were therefore different. They were not.

But times are truly changing. We have extended half-life (“long lasting”) products now; we have products made from a human cell line, and not hamster cell lines. We even have transgenic animal therapies. And we have Hemlibra, an injectable with a half-life of over 600 hours.

But above all, we have probably too many factor products for hemophilia A patients, who number around 20,000 in the US. How will the market justify all the products?

Our factor chart below shows 12 products for hemophilia A that are recombinant, and five products that are plasma-derived (from human blood). Some manufacturers, like Bayer, Novo Nordisk and Takeda, have multiple factor VIII products. It’s like they are in competition with themselves. Some are standard factor products and others are extended half-life.

Bayer’s press release says: “Recognizing the growing shift in patient use toward more recent products, such as Kovaltry® (Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)) and Jivi® (Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant), PEGylated-aucl), Bayer has made the decision to discontinue Kogenate® FS (Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)) in the United States.  

“Keeping the needs of patients in mind, Bayer is keenly aware that they will need sufficient time to work with their HCP to make decisions about their next treatment. The timing of discontinuation will vary by Kogenate FS vial size. Customer demand may lead to depletion of the larger vial sizes of Kogenate FS during the fall of 2022. Remaining Kogenate FS vial sizes are anticipated to be available into 2023.

“As Kogenate FS patients and their caregivers embark on the next step of their journey, Bayer is committed to supporting them. Attached, please find our discontinuation announcement for your reference. Additionally, we have set up a website (explore.bayer.com) and a dedicated Kogenate FS hotline for anyone who has questions regarding this discontinuation, (1-833-40-BAYER), which is available Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 8:00pm ET.” See the full press release here.

If you are a Kogenate FS user, it’s time to contact your HTC staff and discuss next steps. We’ve been through this before over the decades: we know that some patients want to stay with the manufacturer, and will switch to their other products. Other patients will take this as an opportunity to learn more about other products from other manufacturers. Whichever you are, be sure you make your decision with your HTC staff… not the internet! Not even with me. Call the manufacturer and speak with your HTC staff, learn more about these products, and then choose which is right for you.

And probably more change is coming, in products, manufacturers… and eventually gene therapy.

Resolve to be a master of change rather than a victim of change.— Brian Tracy

Making healthy habits stick, with help from BleedingDisorders.com

This is a paid public announcement from Takeda and does not constitute an endorsement of products or services. When you click on the links in this blog entry, you will be directed to the Takeda website. LA Kelley Communications always advises you to be a savvy consumer when contacting any company; do not reveal identifying information against your will.

With everything that life throws at you, it’s not always easy to make healthy habits stick. But for people with a bleeding disorder, diet and exercise are two important ways you can help keep your body—and especially your joints—healthy.1,2

Here are a few quick tips from BleedingDisorders.com that could help you maintain a healthy weight and prevent joint damage.

Eating right and staying strong

An apple a day might not actually keep the doctor away, but eating right is a key element of living a healthy lifestyle. And that might be even more true for people living with bleeding disorders.1

While there isn’t a special diet recommendation for people with bleeding disorders, many of the same guidelines from the USDA apply: more fruits and veggies, less solid fat and sugar.3 But that doesn’t mean you can’t eat the foods you love. Try looking up new recipes that include more healthy ingredients. Cauliflower pizza crust might be your new weeknight favorite!

You can get more info about healthy eating habits at BleedingDisorders.com. And before starting any diet, remember to check with your healthcare provider (HCP) or Hemophilia Treatment Center (HTC).

To keep your body healthy, keep it moving

Exercise is another key aspect of maintaining joint health and staying at a healthy weight.2 While people with bleeding disorders used to be discouraged from participating in sports, modern treatment means that many people can continue to be physically active. In fact, it’s encouraged.2,4

Keep in mind that not all physical activities may be safe for you to do. The National Hemophilia Foundation’s Playing It Safe pamphlet includes a helpful list of physical activities and the level of risk associated with them.4 Here are some examples of low- and high-risk activities.

This is another area where it’s important to talk with your HCP or get in touch with a Hemophilia Treatment Center before getting started. And if you want more info about different types of exercises and how they may help you, check out BleedingDisorders.com.

Stay connected

Feeling inspired to making some healthier life choices? Your first step might be to get in touch with your Hemophilia Treatment Center, where you can get expert advice about managing a bleeding disorder. Your healthcare provider team can also help with any questions about diet and exercise. And of course, connect with the Bleeding Disorders community on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter, and sign up to get the latest news and updates.

References:

  1. Thomas Smith K. Weighty matters. HemAware website. January 30, 2015. Accessed January 27, 2021. https://hemaware.org/mind-body/weighty-matters
  2. Goto M, Takedani H, Yokota K, Haga N. Strategies to encourage physical activity in patients with hemophilia to improve quality of life. J Blood Med. 2016;7:85-98.
  3. U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary guidelines for Americans 2010. December 2010. Accessed January 27, 2021. https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2010/dietaryguidelines2010.pdf
  4. Playing it safe: bleeding disorders, sports and exercise. National Hemophilia Foundation. 2017. Accessed January 27, 2021. https://www.hemophilia.org/sites/default/files/document/files/playing-it-safe_0.pdf

Copyright © 2021 Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited. Lexington, MA 02421. 1-800-828-2088. All rights reserved. TAKEDA and the TAKEDA logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited.

[US-NON-4339v1.0 02/21]

ADVERTISEMENT
HemaBlog Archives
Categories

A Note Regarding COVID-19 and Shipping:
LA Kelley Communications will continue to ship orders as long as the post office remains open. However, it's likely that orders will be slightly delayed. For any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us at info@kelleycom.com
Stay Healthy!