admin

Share your perseverance. Share your gratitude. Share your why.

This is a paid public announcement from Sanofi Genzyme and does not constitute an endorsement of products or services. When you click on the links in this blog entry, you will be direct to a Sanofi Genzyme website. LA Kelley Communications always advises you to be a savvy consumer when contacting any company; do not reveal identifying information against your will.

At Sanofi Genzyme, treating rare blood disorders isn’t just what we do—it’s who we are. Because rare is in our blood. It’s why we strive to make a difference in the lives of patients, caregivers, and physicians. It’s why we pursue the best possible therapies, services, and resources. Why we strive to research, develop, and discover groundbreaking advancements. Why we use our global scale to create a true, lasting difference. From pipeline to patients, we know that our commitment has the potential to truly transform. To shift the trajectory. To change lives.

Whether you are a patient, caregiver or connected to a family with a history of bleeding disorders, our highest priority is your health and well-being. During these ongoing, uncertain times, one constant remains true – the perseverance and support among the bleeding disorders community remains steadfast and stronger than ever.  

See More

Though we haven’t been able to connect in-person, we hope to continue to celebrate our community in new ways every day. Each one of us has a story. A reason why. While our stories may be different, we are connected by a common factor. A desire to give back, to uplift, to seek and to support.

With that spirit in mind, Sanofi Genzyme invites you to Share Your Why.

Through the Share Your Why website, you can share common experiences and discover authentic and relatable stories from people just like you. You can support and inspire others in the hemophilia community by uploading your story and sharing your why through a photo, poem, video or anything else that captures your why – though we’ll only share your why with the community with your approval. You can also ask someone who supported you to share their story as well.

If you are looking to connect, you can also find contact information for the Sanofi Genzyme Community Relations and Education Managers, or CoRes, who are dedicated to providing education to the hemophilia community.

Share your inspiration. Share your perseverance. Share your gratitude. Share your why.

Learn more at shareyourwhy.com.

MAT-US-2107460-v1.0-08/2021

Is your emergency plan up to date?

Our publications address the many challenges you face as you begin life with hemophilia. For this week’s HemaBlog, we suggest you check out this website to learn more about handling life’s many phases and changes!

Laurie

This is a paid public announcement from Takeda and does not constitute an endorsement of products or services. When you click on the links in this blog entry, you will be directed to a Takeda website. LA Kelley Communications always advises you to be a savvy consumer when contacting any company; do not reveal identifying information against your will.

Big changes are coming—as schools and workplaces continue to reopen, we all need to prepare for what’s ahead. For people or loved ones with a bleeding disorder, part of that preparation can include completing an emergency preparedness plan. BleedingDisorders.com has information and reminders that can help you get your plan in order.

Add a medical bracelet to your list of necessary supplies
In case of an emergency, having a medical ID bracelet and carrying a wallet card may help save precious time. There are other things you can do now to prepare for an ER visit that may happen in the future. Download and print an ER checklist to take some of the stress away from urgent situations that may arise.

Take advantage of the calm before the storm
There’s no way to know when an emergency may happen. But there are steps you can take now to prepare yourself, your family, AND the ER staff for any future emergency situations:

  • Find an ER with bleeding disorder experience (ask your doctor for a recommendation)
  • Schedule a pre-emergency appointment at your ER of choice
  • Get emergency preparation information from your hemophilia treatment center team

Find more information about each of these steps and other ways to prepare at BleedingDisorders.com.

Make your voice heard
Until a cure is found, bleeding disorders need to be actively managed throughout a person’s life. That means starting out with a management plan that you are confident fits your needs and goals, and then staying connected with your doctors to make sure that plan changes if needed over time. BleedingDisorders.com offers several discussion guides aimed at helping you better communicate with doctors about the long-term management of your or your loved one’s bleeding disorder. Download and use the guide that works best for you.

Connect with the Bleeding Disorders community on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter. You can also sign up to learn more about a program designed especially for the bleeding disorders community.

References:

  1. Canadian Hemophilia Society. The emergency room: prepare to succeed. Accessed May 25, 2021. https://www.hemophilia.ca/files/er2.pdf

©2021 Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc. Lexington, MA 02421. 1-877-TAKEDA-7. All rights reserved. TAKEDA and the TAKEDA logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited.

US-NON-5509v1.0 06/21

Young Adults and Insurance

This is a paid public announcement from Pfizer and does not constitute an endorsement of products or services. When you click on the links in this blog entry, you will be directed to a Pfizer website. LA Kelley Communications always advises you to be a savvy consumer when contacting any company; do not reveal identifying information against your will.

Making healthy habits stick, with help from BleedingDisorders.com

This is a paid public announcement from Takeda and does not constitute an endorsement of products or services. When you click on the links in this blog entry, you will be directed to the Takeda website. LA Kelley Communications always advises you to be a savvy consumer when contacting any company; do not reveal identifying information against your will.

With everything that life throws at you, it’s not always easy to make healthy habits stick. But for people with a bleeding disorder, diet and exercise are two important ways you can help keep your body—and especially your joints—healthy.1,2

Here are a few quick tips from BleedingDisorders.com that could help you maintain a healthy weight and prevent joint damage.

Eating right and staying strong

An apple a day might not actually keep the doctor away, but eating right is a key element of living a healthy lifestyle. And that might be even more true for people living with bleeding disorders.1

While there isn’t a special diet recommendation for people with bleeding disorders, many of the same guidelines from the USDA apply: more fruits and veggies, less solid fat and sugar.3 But that doesn’t mean you can’t eat the foods you love. Try looking up new recipes that include more healthy ingredients. Cauliflower pizza crust might be your new weeknight favorite!

You can get more info about healthy eating habits at BleedingDisorders.com. And before starting any diet, remember to check with your healthcare provider (HCP) or Hemophilia Treatment Center (HTC).

To keep your body healthy, keep it moving

Exercise is another key aspect of maintaining joint health and staying at a healthy weight.2 While people with bleeding disorders used to be discouraged from participating in sports, modern treatment means that many people can continue to be physically active. In fact, it’s encouraged.2,4

Keep in mind that not all physical activities may be safe for you to do. The National Hemophilia Foundation’s Playing It Safe pamphlet includes a helpful list of physical activities and the level of risk associated with them.4 Here are some examples of low- and high-risk activities.

This is another area where it’s important to talk with your HCP or get in touch with a Hemophilia Treatment Center before getting started. And if you want more info about different types of exercises and how they may help you, check out BleedingDisorders.com.

Stay connected

Feeling inspired to making some healthier life choices? Your first step might be to get in touch with your Hemophilia Treatment Center, where you can get expert advice about managing a bleeding disorder. Your healthcare provider team can also help with any questions about diet and exercise. And of course, connect with the Bleeding Disorders community on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter, and sign up to get the latest news and updates.

References:

  1. Thomas Smith K. Weighty matters. HemAware website. January 30, 2015. Accessed January 27, 2021. https://hemaware.org/mind-body/weighty-matters
  2. Goto M, Takedani H, Yokota K, Haga N. Strategies to encourage physical activity in patients with hemophilia to improve quality of life. J Blood Med. 2016;7:85-98.
  3. U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary guidelines for Americans 2010. December 2010. Accessed January 27, 2021. https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2010/dietaryguidelines2010.pdf
  4. Playing it safe: bleeding disorders, sports and exercise. National Hemophilia Foundation. 2017. Accessed January 27, 2021. https://www.hemophilia.org/sites/default/files/document/files/playing-it-safe_0.pdf

Copyright © 2021 Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited. Lexington, MA 02421. 1-800-828-2088. All rights reserved. TAKEDA and the TAKEDA logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited.

[US-NON-4339v1.0 02/21]

HemaBlog Archives
Categories